Scuola di San Rocco, Venice


Scuola di San Rocco, Venice
   One of the six major confraternities of Venice, founded in 1478 and dedicated to St. Rock (in Italian, Rocco) who spent most of his life tending to those stricken by the plague. The Scuola's meeting hall contains approximately 50 paintings by Tintoretto executed between 1564 and 1587 and most dealing with scenes from the life and Passion of Christ. These provide unusual renditions of traditional religious scenes that are filled with action, enhanced by the brisk application of paint and sharp diagonal arrangements. In the Last Supper, Tintoretto placed the table in a diagonal that recedes rapidly into space, instead of in the usual frontal position. Christ is shown in the background administering the Eucharist to St. Peter, while servants in an adjoining room prepare the meal and a dog in the foreground adds to the commotion. Instead of a solemn scene, the work presents a noisy, mundane depiction that focuses on Christ's humanity more than his divinity. The Crucifixion, a work of huge proportions, shows a panoramic view of Golgotha filled with figures. Again, Tintoretto provided a noisy scene with soldiers pulling up the crosses of the thieves who were crucified alongside Christ, mourners at the Savior's feet, men betting on a game of dice, and other incidentals. The dynamism of the scene is augmented by the series of diagonals Tintoretto included, as well as the heavy fore-shortening of figures and crosses. Other works include the Adoration of the Shepherds, Baptism of Christ, Christ before Pilate, Road to Calvary, Ascension, Brazen Serpent, and Moses Drawing Water from the Rock. This commission represents one of the most extensive ever granted to a single artist of the Renaissance, and stands among the greatest masterpieces of the era.

Historical dictionary of Renaissance art. . 2008.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • San Rocco, Venice — Church of Saint Roch Chiesa di San Rocco Facade of the Chiesa di San Rocco. Basic information Location Venice, Italy Geographic coordinates …   Wikipedia

  • San Polo — is the smallest of the six sestieri of Venice, covering just 86 acres (35 hectares) along the Grand Canal. It is one of the oldest parts of the city, having been settled before the ninth century, when it and San Marco formed part of the Realtine… …   Wikipedia

  • San Giovanni Evangelista, Venice — The church of San Giovanni Evangelista is a 15th century religious building in the San Polo sestiere of the Italian city of Venice. It stands across a courtyard from the Scuola Grande di San Giovanni Evangelista. History Construction on the… …   Wikipedia

  • San Giorgio Maggiore — Basilique San Giorgio Maggiore de Venise Basilique San Giorgio Maggiore de Venise La basilique Latitude Longitude …   Wikipédia en Français

  • List of buildings and structures in Venice — A * Ala Napoleonica * Arsenal B * Biennale di man citya C * Campanile di San Marco * Campo di Sant Angelo * Campo Santa Margherita * Campo San Polo * Campo San Samuele * Campo San Zanipolo * Ca Da Mosto * Ca Foscari * Ca d Oro * Ca Pesaro * Ca… …   Wikipedia

  • Carlton Capri Hotel Venice (Venice) — Carlton Capri Hotel Venice country: Italy, city: Venice (City Centre: Santa Croce) Carlton Capri Hotel Venice Close to the main arrival points in Venice and with the Grand Canal just round the corner, the Hotel Carlton Capri has always been… …   International hotels

  • Basilique San Giorgio Maggiore de Venise — La basilique Présentation …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Scuole Grandi of Venice — The Scuole Grandi of Venice (literally Great Schools ; plural: Scuole Grandi ) were confraternity or sodality institutions in Venice, Italy. They were founded as early as the 13th century as charitable and religious organizations for the laity.… …   Wikipedia

  • Basilique De San Zanipolo — La façade de San Zanipolo Nom local …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Basilique de San Zanipolo — La façade de San Zanipolo Présentation Nom local San Zanipolo Culte Catholique …   Wikipédia en Français


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.